Children

Allah Al-Aleem
– by Bint Abdul Hamid

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Tawheed (Belief in the Oneness of Allah) is the most basic concept of Islam. And the appropriate age to teach this would be at the foundation stage of a child’s life. Allah Al-Aleem, authored by Bint Abdul Hamid, illustrated by Zahra Gulraiz, and published by Prolance touches upon the Tawheed of one of Allah’s Names and Attributes.
This vibrant dual language (Arabic and English) easy-to-read book could become a means to parent-child bonding time. One of the best aspects of this short and sweet book is that it connects the reader to the Qur’an. The aayah posted as reference in each page would be an insightful conversation starter with children.
The illustrator has done a brilliant job in bringing to life the essence of each aayah making it easy for the children to grasp the concepts.
A highly recommended book for 2 – 6 year olds.
You may purchase the book here.

Jasmine in the Wind
– by Ayesha Desai

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Jasmine in the Wind, written by Ayesha Desai, and published by Prolance is one of those children books that is not restricted to children’s library. In this 30+ page book, the author touches the heart of every reader through the life of a Syrian refugee who flees the country with her family.
The trials and obstacles they face, the arduous journey the family along with other families take, the trust they place on the strangers who help them to escape the war-stricken country are not only real for Afraa, the protagonist, but also to all refugees who are living the tumultuous life.
Though this book would be fit for 8 – 13 year olds, I would recommend this book to those who want to understand a refugee’s life in a concise manner.
You may purchase the book in Amazon.

I’m Fasting This Ramadan
– by Zeneefa Zaneer

IFTR

I’m Fasting This Ramadan is a cute picture book that children will relate to, especially the first-time fasters.
In the story, Sakeena, a little girl, is excited to have her first fast. She sees her father, mother, and sister fasting and wants to follow in the footsteps of the Prophet. Would she complete her fast or would her olfactory and visual senses of the table spread win her over?
The family’s support and motivation for the little girl reminds me of our endeavors with my six year old son who had started fasting this year.
The following is his book review:
Sakeena is like me! Her elder sister encouraged her, just like my elder brother encouraged me. I will also fast as much as possible.
The author Zeneefa Zaneer vividly captures the mundane activities and the plight of Sakeena who every now and then forgets she is fasting. The hand drawn illustrations by the author’s 12 year old niece, Afra Anas, is impressive and captivates the young and old.
I highly recommend this book to children of 5 to 8 years of age.
You may purchase the book here. Do check out the GoodReads page.

Ramadan without Daddy
– by Misbah Akhtar

Have you ever wondered how would Ramadan be for kids who are raised by a single parent? How would the children of divorced parents welcome Ramadan? Or would there be less to no celebration at all?
I never thought about it until Djarabi Kitabs Publishing gave me a copy of Ramadan without Daddy to review.
This debut novel by Misbah Akhtar, a single mother of 4, touches upon the life of Khadijah and her brother Danyal who live with their recently divorced mother. Right from the first page the author had me crying out of empathy for the kids whilst they were having a casual conversation on when daddy would return home. She beautifully uses an analogy portraying why a divorce takes place and how it may be the right choice for some families.
Ramadan without Daddy gives an insight into the world of innocent children who are made to be strong in light of the changes in their family.
You may purchase the book in Amazon. Do check out the GoodReads page.
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